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Bitcoin Canadian Subreddit

Let's talk about Bitcoin in Canada
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SelfKey

SelfKey is a blockchain based self-sovereign identity ecosystem that empowers individuals and companies to find more freedom, privacy and wealth through the full ownership of their digital identity.
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21 months ago, Gavin Andresen published "A Scalability Roadmap", including sections called: "Increasing transaction volume", "Bigger Block Road Map", and "The Future Looks Bright". *This* was the Bitcoin we signed up for. It's time for us to take Bitcoin back from the strangle-hold of Blockstream.

A Scalability Roadmap
06 October 2014
by Gavin Andresen
https://web.archive.org/web/20150129023502/http://blog.bitcoinfoundation.org/a-scalability-roadmap
Increasing transaction volume
I expect the initial block download problem to be mostly solved in the next relase or three of Bitcoin Core. The next scaling problem that needs to be tackled is the hardcoded 1-megabyte block size limit that means the network can suppor[t] only approximately 7-transactions-per-second.
Any change to the core consensus code means risk, so why risk it? Why not just keep Bitcoin Core the way it is, and live with seven transactions per second? “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”
Back in 2010, after Bitcoin was mentioned on Slashdot for the first time and bitcoin prices started rising, Satoshi rolled out several quick-fix solutions to various denial-of-service attacks. One of those fixes was to drop the maximum block size from infinite to one megabyte (the practical limit before the change was 32 megabytes– the maximum size of a message in the p2p protocol). The intent has always been to raise that limit when transaction volume justified larger blocks.
“Argument from Authority” is a logical fallacy, so “Because Satoshi Said So” isn’t a valid reason. However, staying true to the original vision of Bitcoin is very important. That vision is what inspires people to invest their time, energy, and wealth in this new, risky technology.
I think the maximum block size must be increased for the same reason the limit of 21 million coins must NEVER be increased: because people were told that the system would scale up to handle lots of transactions, just as they were told that there will only ever be 21 million bitcoins.
We aren’t at a crisis point yet; the number of transactions per day has been flat for the last year (except for a spike during the price bubble around the beginning of the year). It is possible there are an increasing number of “off-blockchain” transactions happening, but I don’t think that is what is going on, because USD to BTC exchange volume shows the same pattern of transaction volume over the last year. The general pattern for both price and transaction volume has been periods of relative stability, followed by bubbles of interest that drive both price and transaction volume rapidly up. Then a crash down to a new level, lower than the peak but higher than the previous stable level.
My best guess is that we’ll run into the 1 megabyte block size limit during the next price bubble, and that is one of the reasons I’ve been spending time working on implementing floating transaction fees for Bitcoin Core. Most users would rather pay a few cents more in transaction fees rather than waiting hours or days (or never!) for their transactions to confirm because the network is running into the hard-coded blocksize limit.
Bigger Block Road Map
Matt Corallo has already implemented the first step to supporting larger blocks – faster relaying, to minimize the risk that a bigger block takes longer to propagate across the network than a smaller block. See the blog post I wrote in August for details.
There is already consensus that something needs to change to support more than seven transactions per second. Agreeing on exactly how to accomplish that goal is where people start to disagree – there are lots of possible solutions. Here is my current favorite:
Roll out a hard fork that increases the maximum block size, and implements a rule to increase that size over time, very similar to the rule that decreases the block reward over time.
Choose the initial maximum size so that a “Bitcoin hobbyist” can easily participate as a full node on the network. By “Bitcoin hobbyist” I mean somebody with a current, reasonably fast computer and Internet connection, running an up-to-date version of Bitcoin Core and willing to dedicate half their CPU power and bandwidth to Bitcoin.
And choose the increase to match the rate of growth of bandwidth over time: 50% per year for the last twenty years. Note that this is less than the approximately 60% per year growth in CPU power; bandwidth will be the limiting factor for transaction volume for the foreseeable future.
I believe this is the “simplest thing that could possibly work.” It is simple to implement correctly and is very close to the rules operating on the network today. Imposing a maximum size that is in the reach of any ordinary person with a pretty good computer and an average broadband internet connection eliminates barriers to entry that might result in centralization of the network.
Once the network allows larger-than-1-megabyte blocks, further network optimizations will be necessary. This is where Invertible Bloom Lookup Tables or (perhaps) other data synchronization algorithms will shine.
The Future Looks Bright
So some future Bitcoin enthusiast or professional sysadmin would download and run software that did the following to get up and running quickly:
  1. Connect to peers, just as is done today.
  2. Download headers for the best chain from its peers (tens of megabytes; will take at most a few minutes)
  3. Download enough full blocks to handle and reasonable blockchain re-organization (a few hundred should be plenty, which will take perhaps an hour).
  4. Ask a peer for the UTXO set, and check it against the commitment made in the blockchain.
From this point on, it is a fully-validating node. If disk space is scarce, it can delete old blocks from disk.
How far does this lead?
There is a clear path to scaling up the network to handle several thousand transactions per second (“Visa scale”). Getting there won’t be trivial, because writing solid, secure code takes time and because getting consensus is hard. Fortunately technological progress marches on, and Nielsen’s Law of Internet Bandwidth and Moore’s Law make scaling up easier as time passes.
The map gets fuzzy if we start thinking about how to scale faster than the 50%-per-increase-in-bandwidth-per-year of Nielsen’s Law. Some complicated scheme to avoid broadcasting every transaction to every node is probably possible to implement and make secure enough.
But 50% per year growth is really good. According to my rough back-of-the-envelope calculations, my above-average home Internet connection and above-average home computer could easily support 5,000 transactions per second today.
That works out to 400 million transactions per day. Pretty good; every person in the US could make one Bitcoin transaction per day and I’d still be able to keep up.
After 12 years of bandwidth growth that becomes 56 billion transactions per day on my home network connection — enough for every single person in the world to make five or six bitcoin transactions every single day. It is hard to imagine that not being enough; according the the Boston Federal Reserve, the average US consumer makes just over two payments per day.
So even if everybody in the world switched entirely from cash to Bitcoin in twenty years, broadcasting every transaction to every fully-validating node won’t be a problem.
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Requesting a world map visualizing real-time Bitcoin transactions(useful links below)

Can someone make a flat world map visualizing Bitcoin transactions. Here is a website with current visualizations but they look a little clunky and this one in particular only shows transactions from major Exchanges. Really want this to happen so DM me if you need anything
submitted by AceOrigins to wallpaperengine [link] [comments]

Here's a side project I built over the weekend: Real-time Bitcoin transactions plotted over Google Maps.

Here's a side project I built over the weekend: Real-time Bitcoin transactions plotted over Google Maps. submitted by locksley to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What exactly is this map of unconfirmed transactions showing? /r/Bitcoin

What exactly is this map of unconfirmed transactions showing? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

I made a realtime bitcoin transaction map visualization

I made a realtime bitcoin transaction map visualization submitted by yang140 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

TIL that all bitcoin transactions are public (here is a live map)

submitted by CaptainTurkeyBreast to todayilearned [link] [comments]

Live Bitcoin Transactions Earth Map ;)

Live Bitcoin Transactions Earth Map ;) submitted by cryptohoney to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

21 months ago, Gavin Andresen published "A Scalability Roadmap", including sections called: "Increasing transaction volume", "Bigger Block Road Map", and "The Future Looks Bright". *This* was the Bitcoin we signed up for. It's time for us to take Bitcoin back from the strangle-hold of Blocks /r/btc

21 months ago, Gavin Andresen published submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Querying the Bitcoin blockchain with R, mapping transactions

submitted by Usernamemeh to Nanoeconomics [link] [comments]

Show HN: A realtime Bitcoin transaction map visualization

Show HN: A realtime Bitcoin transaction map visualization submitted by qznc_bot to hackernews [link] [comments]

NEW PRODUCTS FOR THE CRYPTOCURRENCY WORLD POWERED BY ($S4F)

NEW PRODUCTS FOR THE CRYPTOCURRENCY WORLD POWERED BY ($S4F)
Hello Crypto World!
There is news:
We are getting closer and closer to the official date of the S4FE launch:
Saturday, November 14th, 2020
What will happen on that date?
S4FE can proudly look back on three years of product development and announce that the S4FE rockets will start on November 14th, 2020.
The following products are published and made available to the public:
Launch of the S4FE search engine, available online from November 14th, 2020, at www.s4fe.io.

https://preview.redd.it/lmyvnvoyzms51.png?width=1916&format=png&auto=webp&s=763f5a00cf51148a7e4cf76e354e43ba308ee533
The S4FE search engine is a public and free search engine for objects of all kinds and will be the link between private customers, producers, law enforcement agencies, and insurance companies.
Private and corporate customers will be able to create a kind of "cloud" (we call it "S4FE").
In this S4FE, valuables can be linked or managed with the digital world.
PoO - Proof of Ownership is being revolutionized. 
From November 14th, it will be possible to digitally map an object's ownership and transfer items digitally from "User A" to "User B" via mouse clicks.
The lost and stolen function will also be fully available and usable, which means that objects can be tracked in real-time and reported as stolen in real-time in the event of theft, for example.
For stolen goods, the transport and sale of stolen property is made much more complicated for thieves and can involve some complexities.
During a spontaneous police check, stolen things can appear in the system that was stolen a few minutes ago and have not yet been reported in the police system— the risk of being caught red-handed increases.
The S4FE app contains the same functions as the S4FE search engine, only optimized for IOS and Android devices.
The S4FE app will be available from November 14th, 2020 in the Apple Store and the Google Play Store.
The S4FE ST!CKER is a product that we developed to connect physical objects with the digital world.

https://preview.redd.it/dfumfnh30ns51.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=103b73cd9dd6d766fd2018b3e431a2b89c688b20
https://preview.redd.it/sgtg7oh30ns51.jpg?width=853&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=aab044e022b9f522fba8e6ecbca059f8611d2b22
https://preview.redd.it/40ktpph30ns51.jpg?width=1030&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=5d278261ae14b4aeaa0d15de63ca768e58b892d2
https://preview.redd.it/4oul1ph30ns51.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c437bac621d77b00424dee9abcf1da1065142e06
https://preview.redd.it/7qhyirh30ns51.jpg?width=781&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c284852afb8cb19e05e4c64edd0787c5d9b72465
https://preview.redd.it/u057h1i30ns51.jpg?width=852&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=8399eb6f9b10e9a9250126c26040524442945b24
https://preview.redd.it/v3r1jrh30ns51.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4c55e0ec95b119f2e80dbfa68e916bef746fc81f
https://preview.redd.it/smwbmoh30ns51.jpg?width=1024&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d02a7a3fd80cd82bc1bd74a1d03f18cb7c073038
https://preview.redd.it/1lx695i30ns51.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0113ec3afd8a0b962fb3a67f94fc9fb3a642729b
https://preview.redd.it/6avpqmh30ns51.jpg?width=1280&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0ecbd85cf06b1f3799cc9548656c1aa2185ab6a0
Do you often lose your iPhone?
Have you ever accidentally left your laptop at the airport?
Then the S4FE ST! CKER is the perfect product for you.
People who find an object, e.g., your laptop, can scan the S4FE ST! CKER via smartphone and contact you directly via the S4FE app.
Updates on prices for the S4FE ST! CKER will be available soon.
Launch of the S4FE online shop: Our customers will have the opportunity to purchase the S4FE ST! CKER via the S4FE shop. Price updates will follow shortly. In the online shop, it will be possible to pay via cryptocurrencies or conveniently via credit card.
S4FE Transactions:
S4FE is a blockchain/crypto company.
We attach great importance to transparency, which is why all transactions on the S4FE network are publicly displayed.
So you can watch the S4FE network grow in real-time.
Similar to the Bitcoin Explorer, but not for Bitcoins, but objects.
More information will follow shortly.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Es gibt Neuigkeiten:
Wir rücken immer wie näher an das offizielle Datum vom S4FE Launch:
Samstag, 14. NOVEMBER 2020
Was passiert an diesem Datum?
S4FE darf stolz auf 3 Jahre Produktentwicklung zurückblicken und verkünden, dass am 14. November die S4FE Raketen gezündet werden.
Folgende Produkte werden veröffentlicht und der Öffentlichkeit zugänglich gemacht:
Launch der S4FE Suchmaschine, ab dem 14. November 2020 Online abrufbar unter www.s4fe.io.
Die S4FE Suchmaschine ist eine öffentliche und kostenlose Suchmaschine für Gegenstände jeder Art und wird das Bindeglied zwischen Privatkunden, Produzenten, Strafverfolgungsbehörde und Versicherungen darstellen.
Privat und Firmenkunden werden eine Art “Cloud” (wir nennen es “S4FE”) anlegen können.
In diesem S4FE können Wertgegenstände mit der digitalen Welt verknüpft bzw. verwaltet werden.
PoO - Proof of Ownership wird revolutioniert, da es ab dem 14. November möglich sein wird, den Besitztum eines Gegenstandes digital abzubilden und Items digital von “User A” zu “User B” zu transferieren via Mausklicks.
Die Lost und Stolen Funktion wird ebenfalls vollumfänglich verfügbar und nutzbar sein, das bedeutet, Gegenstände können in Echtzeit getrackt werden und bei bspw. einem Diebstahl in Echtzeit als gestohlen gemeldet werden.
Für Hehler wird somit der Transport und die Veräußerung von Diebesgut wesentlich schwieriger gestaltet und mit einigen Komplikationen verbunden.
Bei einer spontanen Polizeikontrolle können so beispielsweise gestohlene Dinge im System auftauchen, die vor ein paar Minuten frisch geklaut wurden und noch nicht im Polizeisystem erfasst sind. Die Gefahr steigt in flagranti erwischt zu werden.
Die S4FE App beinhaltet dieselben Funktionen wie die S4FE Suchmaschine nur optimiert für IOS und Android-Geräte.
Die S4FE App wird ab dem 14. November 2020 im Apple Store sowie im Google Play Store verfügbar sein.
Der S4FE ST!CKER ist ein Produkt, welches wir entwickelt haben, um physische Gegenstände mit der digitalen Welt zu verknüpfen.
Verlierst du häufig dein Iphone?
Hast du schon einmal am Flughafen aus Versehen deinen Laptop liegen lassen?
Dann ist der S4FE ST!CKER das perfekte Produkt für dich.
Personen die einen Gegenstand finden, bspw. deinen Laptop, können den S4FE ST!CKER abscannen via Smartphone und über die S4FE App sich direkt mit dir in Verbindung setzen.
Updates über Preise vom S4FE ST!CKER wird es in Kürze geben.
Launch vom S4FE Online-Shop: Über den S4FE Shop werden unsere Kunden die Möglichkeit haben, den S4FE ST!CKER zu beziehen. Preisupdates folgen in Kürze. Im Online-Shop wird es die Möglichkeit geben via Kryptowährungen oder bequem via Kreditkarte zu bezahlen.
S4FE Transactions:
S4FE ist ein Blockchain / Krypto Unternehmen.
Wir legen enormen Wert auf Transparenz, deshalb werden sämtliche Transaktionen auf dem S4FE Netzwerk öffentlich angezeigt.
Du kannst also in Echtzeit beobachten, wie das S4FE Netzwerk wächst.
Ähnlich dem Bitcoin Explorer, aber nicht für Bitcoins, sondern für Gegenstände.
Mehr Informationen folgen in Kürze.
submitted by S4FE_io to S4fe_official [link] [comments]

Realtime Bitcoin Transaction Map

submitted by subscribe-by-reddit to UnionSquareVentures [link] [comments]

World map of Bitcoin transactions [1 hour timelapse]

World map of Bitcoin transactions [1 hour timelapse] submitted by bookhockey24 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Raoul Pal and Michael Saylor's Bitcoin vs Ethereum analysis is deeply flawed, and here is why.

Regarding the Bitcoin vs Ethereum narrative
Allocating capital in Bitcoin but not in Ethereum is a bet that the planned road-map for Ethereum will not be successfully implemented and/or its economic properties will not function as designed once the final phase of ETH 2.0 goes live. The combination of PoS, sharding and EIP-1559 will allow for a monetary policy that can sustain the system with zero, possibly negative, issuance. Detailed explanations of how this is possible has been documented through numerous interviews and blogs with developers and pundits. We also must take into consideration that even if the issuance is above zero, the returns from staking Ether must be accounted to compare the long-term holding value proposition against something like Bitcoin. If the staking rewards provide ~3% annual returns and issuance is ~2% then the equivalent issuance for a PoW protocol would be ~-1% (this will never happen in the Bitcoin protocol).
Addressing the claim that Ether is not money
The narrative that Ether is not money because the Ethereum protocol is not designed to exclusively function as money is akin to saying that the Internet is not a good emailing system because it is not exclusively designed to transmit emails. This type of narrative is trying to restrict the definition of money by suggesting that its underlying protocol should not have functionality that extends beyond the conventional way we think of it. The reality is that Ethereum is much better suited for a digital economy - Ether is its native monetary asset. The ability to issue other forms of digital assets and execute computer logic in a trustless unified system with a natively defined monetary asset encompasses all the fundamental building blocks of a future digital economy. This is a future where monetary, financial and information systems can take advantage of the inclusiveness, permissionless and trustless aspects that are central to the Bitcoin value proposition.
The Ethereum protocol is designed to do a lot of wonderful things, but it costs money to operate the network and that cost must be covered by something of value that can be easily liquidated or exchanged into other things of value.... otherwise known as money. The idea that Ether is more akin to oil than gold/money just because the price metric for computations is called "gas" falls apart under scrutiny. Ether is strictly used as a monetary incentive. It is not magically burned to propel a fictitious machine that runs the network... the computers that run the Ethereum network run under the same physical principles from the ones of Bitcoin - they consume energy and someone has to pay for it. It just so happens that the monetary rewards and cost of transactions operating the Ethereum network are done exclusively in Ether, and therefore it serves as a monetary base. In addition, Ether has been used as the monetary base for the acquisition of other digital assets during their ICO phase. Lastly, Paypal has revealed they will be including Ether as a means of payment for online merchants. Saying that Ether is not money is like saying the sky isn't blue.
Additional thoughts
  1. The combination of staking, EIP-1559 and sharding will allow ETH to reduce issuance ahead of Bitcoin's schedule. It is very likely going to allow for sustainable zero issuance which is something that is still up in the air for Bitcoin.
  2. The switch from PoW to PoS will dramatically reduce the operational cost of the network while incentivizing ownership of Ether. The reduction in operational cost is a huge factor contributing to a sustainable monetary policy.
  3. The true soundness of Ether as a store of wealth needs to account for the returns from staking. That means that even if the nominal issuance remained higher than Bitcoin, it could still a better investment when you account for the staking returns.
  4. Ethereum can operate as an entire financial system. It allows for issuance of new tokens and it can operate autonomously as a digital assets exchange... so that means that it can be an exchange for tokenized FIAT currencies, cryptocurrencies, tokenized securities and commodities. Think of a global market for stocks, commodities, future contracts and derivatives.
  5. The integration with digital assets is done natively in one network. Ethereum serves as a native monetary asset with sound properties. Tokenized bitcoins would not only significantly reduce security (value would be lost if EITHER network is compromised) it also makes little sense if Ethereum's soundness (staking - issuance) is superior to Bitcoin.
  6. There are a gazillion more use cases for Ethereum that would benefit from having a natively defined monetary asset.
  7. Ultimately Bitcoin might serve as digital gold as a hedge against Ethereum. So they can coexist, but they are still competing with each other in terms of building value. Every investor who is getting into cryptocurrencies should be asking what assets to buy and why. Money allocated to Bitcoin cannot be allocated to Ethereum and vice-versa.
submitted by TheWierdGuy to ethereum [link] [comments]

Raoul Pal and Michael Saylor's Bitcoin vs Ethereum analysis is deeply flawed... here is why.

Regarding the Bitcoin vs Ethereum narrative
Allocating capital in Bitcoin but not in Ethereum is a bet that the planned road-map for Ethereum will not be successfully implemented and/or its economic properties will not function as designed once the final phase of ETH 2.0 goes live. The combination of PoS, sharding and EIP-1559 will allow for a monetary policy that can sustain the system with zero, possibly negative, issuance. Detailed explanations of how this is possible has been documented through numerous interviews and blogs with developers and pundits. We also must take into consideration that even if the issuance is above zero, the returns from staking Ether must be accounted to compare the long-term holding value proposition against something like Bitcoin. If the staking rewards provide ~3% annual returns and issuance is ~2% then the equivalent issuance for a PoW protocol would be ~-1% (this will never happen in the Bitcoin protocol).
Addressing the claim that Ether is not money
The narrative that Ether is not money because the Ethereum protocol is not designed to exclusively function as money is akin to saying that the Internet is not a good emailing system because it is not exclusively designed to transmit emails. This type of narrative is trying to restrict the definition of money by suggesting that its underlying protocol should not have functionality that extends beyond the conventional way we think of it. The reality is that Ethereum is much better suited for a digital economy - Ether is its native monetary asset. The ability to issue other forms of digital assets and execute computer logic in a trustless unified system with a natively defined monetary asset encompasses all the fundamental building blocks of a future digital economy. This is a future where monetary, financial and information systems can take advantage of the inclusiveness, permissionless and trustless aspects that are central to the Bitcoin value proposition.
The Ethereum protocol is designed to do a lot of wonderful things, but it costs money to operate the network and that cost must be covered by something of value that can be easily liquidated or exchanged into other things of value.... otherwise known as money. The idea that Ether is more akin to oil than gold/money just because the price metric for computations is called "gas" falls apart under scrutiny. Ether is strictly used as a monetary incentive. It is not magically burned to propel a fictitious machine that runs the network... the computers that run the Ethereum network run under the same physical principles from the ones of Bitcoin - they consume energy and someone has to pay for it. It just so happens that the monetary rewards and cost of transactions operating the Ethereum network are done exclusively in Ether, and therefore it serves as a monetary base. In addition, Ether has been used as the monetary base for the acquisition of other digital assets during their ICO phase. Lastly, Paypal has revealed they will be including Ether as a means of payment for online merchants. Saying that Ether is not money is like saying the sky isn't blue.
Additional thoughts
  1. The combination of staking, EIP-1559 and sharding will allow ETH to reduce issuance ahead of Bitcoin's schedule. It is very likely going to allow for sustainable zero issuance which is something that is still up in the air for Bitcoin.
  2. The switch from PoW to PoS will dramatically reduce the operational cost of the network while incentivizing ownership of Ether. The reduction in operational cost is a huge factor contributing to a sustainable monetary policy.
  3. The true soundness of Ether as a store of wealth needs to account for the returns from staking. That means that even if the nominal issuance remained higher than Bitcoin, it could still a better investment when you account for the staking returns.
  4. Ethereum can operate as an entire financial system. It allows for issuance of new tokens and it can operate autonomously as a digital assets exchange... so that means that it can be an exchange for tokenized FIAT currencies, cryptocurrencies, tokenized securities and commodities. Think of a global market for stocks, commodities, future contracts and derivatives.
  5. The integration with digital assets is done natively in one network. Ethereum serves as a native monetary asset with sound properties. Tokenized bitcoins would not only significantly reduce security (value would be lost if EITHER network is compromised) it also makes little sense if Ethereum's soundness (staking - issuance) is superior to Bitcoin.
  6. There are a gazillion more use cases for Ethereum that would benefit from having a natively defined monetary asset.
  7. Ultimately Bitcoin might serve as digital gold as a hedge against Ethereum. So they can coexist, but they are still competing with each other in terms of building value. Every investor who is getting into cryptocurrencies should be asking what assets to buy and why. Money allocated to Bitcoin cannot be allocated to Ethereum and vice-versa.
submitted by TheWierdGuy to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Do Autonomous Trucks dream of C.W. McCall? Part 9- a new home

Tran was a shitty gambler, Chi mused. He played poker like he was sure the next hand would save him. It didn’t. He overpromised and underpaid. Chi planned on kicking his ass to send a message, but Tran ran that line of shit about millions in bitcoin. Against his better judgment, Chi settled Tran’s debts with every other loan-shark in town and fronted another stack of cash.
And all that ended with Tran gambling that away, talking a load of shit and ending up in this dumpster with a trash-bag tied around his neck.
Chi looked at Tran’s phone and wondered if the money was ever real. Considering it might point back at him, he smashed it against the corner of the dumpster a few times before dropping it and walking back to his car. He had some debts to pay.
Falstaff looked at the paper maps in the motel’s office. He followed the Interstate southeast to the desert and what used to be the California- Arizona border. He looked for places he hadn’t heard of being associated with edgy festivals. Even better, motels with chain-sounding names. That’s the place nobody’d look for him.
He packed his car, coaxed Hank back in the carrier and got in his car. Before he got going, he booted his laptop and put the memory card back in. Evidence wasn’t a problem any more, it was getting found.
He copied the contents to his laptop and poked around. Ten minutes later, he had set up a password cracker against the accounts, hoping that Tran would choose something easier to remember and therefore guessable.
He plugged the laptop’s power supply into the car’s cigarette lighter, then put the laptop on a bag on the back seat.
East he went.
Geoff had the night shift on another Internet giant’s campus. This meant he drove a golf cart around once or twice, then parked himself in the camera room and tried not to sleep. Sleeping would cut his hourly wage and get him kicked back to dangerous, dirty jobs like protecting rail yards from motivated thieves.
He used to pick a skill and research it. He learned to get basic vocabulary in Spanish, Mandarin, Fujianese and was trying Tagalog. He could carry a conversation as long as it revolved around simple topics, like where the bathroom, parking lot and reception desk were, or that he wanted to purchase something.
Tonight he picked at that truck thing again. He used a map application to virtually drive between Phoenix and San Diego. After a few hours, he found the spot on the Interstate that looked like the right landscape from the cameras on the pinball machine. He looked at the street view and the camera view over the older man’s shoulder.
Motherfucker. Spot dab in the withdrawn zone.
Who travels to the middle of nowhere to steal from a truck and only take some stuff?
Couldn’t be locals. Locals would strip the truck bare.
He watched the video again. Looks like they took plain grocery shipping boxes.
Inside job? And steal boxes of fresh pasta and imported wine?
He scrolled back and took a few screengrabs. When he worked security at the shiny new headquarters, they had some wild surveillance tools. Real time tracking using AI image enhancement and they taught you how to use it.
Geoff got pretty good at it. He looked over at his phone and opened the scheduling application for his employer. He underbid a few other people and picked up the next shift.
Which got him reinstated access to the HQ’s slick surveillance system. He uploaded the images and asked it to clean it up. He expected this to take a bit of time, so he cleaned up and got ready for his shift.
And his phone dinged. A match.
That he didn’t ask for. Ten seconds later, he saw a corporate ID card. With that bored look of middle aged techie.
Falstaff.
Huh. Dumb name. Looked familiar, but so did every other techie from where he stood. Probably had more money in options than he’d ever earn.
As he drove to work, he wondered why a techie would be robbing trucks in the middle of nowhere instead of getting rich or dying fat here.
He parked, took the shuttle and made it a few minutes early for shift change. He expected a slow night.
Five minutes into the shift, he was sipping good coffee and watching the camera feeds when someone asked for him by name at the desk.
He looked up and saw one of the muscular internal security people smiling at him. Close cropped hair, clear coiled earpiece and the look of someone who worked out at an actual gym instead of lifting five gallon buckets filled with water in a rest stop parking lot. Looked like internal security, maybe even VIP protection.
Guy probably had pretty good benefits. Geoff would love to get a job like that.
Geoff pushed his coffee to the side and stood up to greet the guy asking about him.
Enzokuhle gave Geoff a broad smile and introduced himself as Enzo. The two men were pleasant with one another, but Geoff seemed wary. Enzo didn’t know why he was there either. He was scheduled to do driving and personal protection for a senior exec working in his office, but he got tasked with asking a contract security guard some questions about something very hush-hush.
Whatever. He was good with people. Perhaps he’d learn something.
“Geoff, may we speak outside? This is a sensitive matter, requiring some discretion”
Geoff motioned to his puzzled co-worker by holding up his hand, splaying his fingers and mouthing the word “Five”. The two men walked through the stark but stylish lobby onto a manicured park-like field.
“So, what do you want from me? Not too often we get you guys involved”
“An hour ago, you performed a lookup for a company employee. Have you been in contact with that employee?”
“No. I had an image I wanted processed”
There was an uncomfortable silence as the walked. Geoff realized that Enzo was listening to his ear-piece. Enzo was nodding as he listened.
“I see. So you haven’t seen this person outside the picture you uploaded”
“No, but I have an idea where he might be”
Enzokuhle put his hand up. He wanted to end this transaction as quickly as possible.
“Thank you. Please do not speak of this to anybody else. Your discretion is most important here. Return to your post and we will contact you if we need more from you”. He pointed Geoff back to the lobby without making eye contact.
Galina Ivanova spent a few more minutes talking to Enzo, then thanked him. This was a false lead. AI must be glitchy. No chance that the developer who stole almost a billion dollars was unloading trucks instead of moving that big pile of money somewhere.
Any additional time logged to this goose chase would make her metrics worse. She took off her headset and tried to go back go sleep.
Geoff sat back in his chair. He remembered a video of a scuba diver diving under a moving container ship, looking up at the moving propeller and how close they almost came to a gruesome death.
Why was that guy important enough to throw an alert to internal security?
He looked at his phone and the email with Falstaff’s ID photo. He couldn’t do any lookups to see the last time he was in any of the buildings, since that fed into whatever alerts that brought Internal Security down on his head.
But he remembered something. Employee parking wasn’t owned by Corporate. It was a separate company, which required him to remind annoyed techies when their photo ID wouldn’t trip the gate when some absent-minded developer forgot their garage access card.
Last time this Falstaff guy used the garage was almost two months ago. Such a stereotype. Silver Porsche. Now he knew why the guy looked familiar. He left the day that big brouhaha happened. Rumors flew about the security and custodial staff- some developers stole the next phone design or a treasure trove of celebrity nude photos or something else of value to these people. Anybody too vocal with their opinions got fired and walked out, which Geoff wanted to avoid.
Whatever it was, it was valuable and embarrassing. Made sense to go hide in the desert.
And he had an idea where Falstaff was. Maybe, if he brought him back, there’d be a big enough reward to let him to leave the Valley and go back to Ohio. Pay off debts and raise his family.
It wasn’t like he was making any headway here anyway. He was going on a road trip.
Falstaff was driving slower now. He needed better fuel economy and to take the time to scout out his next stop. Some towns had plain dried up and others still too connected. The last place looked promising. The gas station was a weatherbeaten Sinclair, with a repainted dinosaur. They only took cash. The chain restaurant was burned out and there was a motel “a few miles up”.
Hank was sleeping, but Falstaff’s laptop dinged with the results of his attempt to crack Tran’s big blob of data.
He had passwords for the handful of accounts Tran had dumped on that chip. They weren’t for the financial application he and Tran were working on. Instead, they were for the store’s production environment. He didn’t have a billion dollars in untraceable currency, but he could send almost any consumer good to anybody on the planet and clean up afterwards.
He had some investigating to do, and he preferred a cheap motel to do it from rather than his car.
He rented a room for a few days from a surprised old man and tried to ignore the curious stares from a few permanent residents of the motel.
At least Hank enjoyed exploring the room and this motel would not get the camera friendly festival crowd.
submitted by lawtechie to talesoflawtechie [link] [comments]

Official statement needed

I'm sure you all saw the cheater interview, Nikita, how is it possible that you do not detect speedhackers, no recoil, bullet damage and speed editing and extremely high K/D ratios on the client yourself and why aren't those guys instant banned?
I'm baffled how easy it is to cheat in this game after watching the cheater interview that popped up a while ago. There is no way or excuse that you won't get insta banned if you run around the map like crazy, being able to boost your ammo speed and damage, full auto semi auto guns, only kill head/eyes...it feels like BSG is benefitting from the cheater community...
That cheater who got interviewed pays 300 fucking dollars per month for his cheat and the reseller he got the cheat from had 200.000 $ worth of transactions on his bitcoin account within 2 weeks...
If that many shit runs on the client instead of the server, you should track stats like "average movement speed of player" or at least "K/D" ratio, if it's above 20 (landmark has 16), you should match those guys with other mega high K/D players, let the cheaters play with each other!
submitted by babacinha to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

3 NEW Pay Depot LITECOIN(LTC)/BITCOIN(BTC) ATM at EXXON Gas Station Locations - DELAWARE!

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submitted by PayDepot to litecoin [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Operation Mockingbird - remember that time when Bitcoin was peer-to-peer electronic cash?

Do you remember what it was like in 2013 and earlier when Satoshi / Gavin were running the project and the goal was more users, merchants and scaling?
Do you remember that time when the exciting projects were getting merchants to accept Bitcoin for payments, wallet apps, and maps of businesses and people that used and accepted Bitcoin as money?
Do you remember that time when the MIT digital currency initiative (sponsored by Jeffrey Epstein and his mysterious intelligence agency "investment money"), MasterCard, and Western Union all invested in Blockstream who suddenly consolidated control of the Bitcoin development group, smearing and attacking anyone who wouldn't get on board?
Remember that time that Theymos, who had been pro-Bitcoin scaling suddenly had a personality change and started censoring and banning anyone who talked about scaling bitcoin from the two largest discussion platforms, bitcoin talk dot org and r\bitcoin?
Remember that time when fake Bitcoin celebrities with marketing teams behind them started appearing out of nowhere with the view that we shouldn't increase the capacity of Bitcoin so more people can use it?
Remember that time that countless NPC's changed the community's narrative from peer-to-peer electronic cash with the goal of merchant and user adoption to "digital gold" or some kind of digital tulip ponzi scheme that's too expensive to use for day-to-day currency?
Remember that time when the miners, now consolidated in CCP controlled China, suddenly voted against their own best-interests, and decided to run software that rate-limits Bitcoin to 5 transactions per second, despite overwhelming community opposition?
Pepperidge Farm remembers.
This is Operation Mockingbird folks, just a 21st Century version of it. So was SegWit, BSV/CSW, and now this IFP bullshit from Amaury.
submitted by some_crypto_guy to btc [link] [comments]

Tear my CyberSec plan apart

Hey guys. Just coming finishing up my second year as a "Jack of all Trades" sysadmin/IT and after Passing my Sec+ my boss has approved my request to change my title to Sec Admin and work mostly full time on Securing our network as these past 2 years we've seen pretty large growth with at least 3 ransomware attacks and one employee installing bitcoin miners and getting away with it because literally nothing is logged.
Our Company consists of our main office with 9 adminstrators and 3 IT guys. Me and another guy, and our manager. We have a 30 person call center in the building with a remote call center connected back here. We serve as a telecom with roughly 40,000 users. Since we have a bunch of phone equipment and such, We have 6 almost identical Colos that each have the work divided between them, but they do not act as failovers. If one Colo loses internet/power, those 10k or so customers are SOL
Our security stance is this - and I quote "Don't get attacked". Hasn't worked so far. We do at the very least have a Fortigate
Leads me to the CyberSec plan. My first project was adding and configuring a WSUS server so our servers that were last updated in 2018 can at least be a little more secure. I just now finished it and the documentation and now My director and CEO have thrown their full support behind whatever I suggest So i'm kinda insanely excited to just get to get after it with very little redtape. I've spent the last few weeks planning out what I think we need to at least get us up to "Mediocre" standing.
Below is my list and my explanations. If all is good I will present this to our C-suite as our CyberSecuity Initiative. This list has gone through several changes and I know that some is way too much or I have the totally wrong idea on what this stuff is. As title says, feel free to tear it apart. I'm excited to learn all of this stuff.
9/15 Updated Cybersec Initiative Current List: -Full Risk/Impact analysis with a Disaster Recovery Plan // Was very surprised to hear we don't have any of this. We just got hit with a hurricane and we were down for almost a week because no disaster plans or fail overs
-Entire Network Map with help of LibreNMS or other Net tools // We don't have any maps of our network. Most of what I know is because I have to ask where a server is and I keep a notebook of it around.
-Audit security of our POS kiosk systems // We have a few kiosks out that process transactions and I know nothing of any security controls. Would it be a good idea to add these to our domain as well?
-Contain the ridiculous VM sprawl // We have VMs that we have no idea what/if they do anything. Need to contain this
-Combine our Call center and Main DC, Full permission Audit, add Group policy restrictions (Time of Day, Lockout), add all COLO servers to domain, add all technicians to domain // This is a big one. No point in my opinion of having 2 domains when one is literally one group called "Call center Agents". None of our field guys are added to our domain, and none of our COLO servers are on our domain. Group policy updates to limit time of day and password policies
-Create a honeypot/net // This one is mostly for fun
-Full rollout of Security Onion // One sensor at each COLO plus our main office network. Wazuh/Malwarebytes configured on every PC/Server we have.
-Harden our outward facing Webservers // We don't do much as our websites are administered by another company, But i'd like to talk with them about it
-Disable SNMPv2 or change community string // I know that our printers still have this
-Create .iso of "stock OS" with malwarebytes/Wazuh already installed, system alreay hardened // More of a convenience
-Configure Guest Wifi using best practices
-Audit/Use Backups // I know we have backups of some things but not everything. Set this up with raid and/or offsite backup
-Implement 2FA/SSO on user PCs // Outlook 2FA and SSO for some of our resources
-Turn on firewall logging // Thats right. No logs on firewall at all.
-Implement security policies on our Outlook stuff // Phishing detection, logging, etc
-Train users on phishing campaigns and such // This wouldn't be until next year during annual company training
TLDR: I'm now a sec admin and I'm looking for critique on if/why the above controls wouldn't work or are too much/overkill on our network that takes "Security through obscurity" to a new level. Feel free to fuck me up y'all.
Edit: A lot more help than I thought I'd get. This has all been great. You guys are so much nicer than linux4noobs
submitted by HighSeasCaesar to sysadmin [link] [comments]

Technical: Confidential Transactions and Their Implementation Tradeoffs

As requested by estradata here: https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/iylou9/what_are_some_of_the_latest_innovations_in_the/g6heez1/
It is a general issue that crops up at the extremes of cryptography, with quantum breaks being just one of the extremes of (classical) cryptography.

Computational vs Information-Theoretic

The dichotomy is between computationally infeasible vs informationally-theoretic infeasible. Basically:
Quantum breaks represent a possible reduction in computational infeasibility of certain things, but not information-theoretic infeasibility.
For example, suppose you want to know what 256-bit preimages map to 256-bit hashes. In theory, you just need to build a table with 2256 entries and start from 0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 and so on. This is computationally infeasible, but not information-theoretic infeasible.
However, suppose you want to know what preimages, of any size, map to 256-bit hashes. Since the preimages can be of any size, after finishing with 256-bit preimages, you have to proceed to 257-bit preimages. And so on. And there is no size limit, so you will literally never finish. Even if you lived forever, you would not complete it. This is information-theoretic infeasible.

Commitments

How does this relate to confidential transactions? Basically, every confidential transaction simply hides the value behind a homomorphic commitment. What is a homomorphic commitment? Okay, let's start with commitments. A commitment is something which lets you hide something, and later reveal what you hid. Until you reveal it, even if somebody has access to the commitment, they cannot reverse it to find out what you hid. This is called the "hiding property" of commitments. However, when you do reveal it (or "open the commitment"), then you cannot replace what you hid with some other thing. This is called the "binding property" of commitments.
For example, a hash of a preimage is a commitment. Suppose I want to commit to something. For example, I want to show that I can predict the future using the energy of a spare galaxy I have in my pocket. I can hide that something by hashing a description of the future. Then I can give the hash to you. You still cannot learn the future, because it's just a hash, and you can't reverse the hash ("hiding"). But suppose the future event occurs. I can reveal that I did, in fact, know the future. So I give you the description, and you hash it and compare it to the hash I gave earlier. Because of preimage resistance, I cannot retroactively change what I hid in the hash, so what I gave must have been known to me at the time that I gave you the commitment i..e. hash ("binding").

Homomorphic Commitments

A homomorphic commitment simply means that if I can do certain operations on preimages of the commitment scheme, there are certain operations on the commitments that would create similar ("homo") changes ("morphic") to the commitments. For example, suppose I have a magical function h() which is a homomorphic commitment scheme. It can hide very large (near 256-bit) numbers. Then if h() is homomorphic, there may be certain operations on numbers behind the h() that have homomorphisms after the h(). For example, I might have an operation <+> that is homomorphic in h() on +, or in other words, if I have two large numbers a and b, then h(a + b) = h(a) <+> h(b). + and <+> are different operations, but they are homomorphic to each other.
For example, elliptic curve scalars and points have homomorphic operations. Scalars (private keys) are "just" very large near-256-bit numbers, while points are a scalar times a standard generator point G. Elliptic curve operations exist where there is a <+> between points that is homomorphic on standard + on scalars, and a <*> between a scalar and a point that is homomorphic on standard * multiplication on scalars.
For example, suppose I have two large scalars a and b. I can use elliptic curve points as a commitment scheme: I can take a <*> G to generate a point A. It is hiding since nobody can learn what a is unless I reveal it (a and A can be used in standard ECDSA private-public key cryptography, with the scalar a as the private key and the point A as the public key, and the a cannot be derived even if somebody else knows A). Thus, it is hiding. At the same time, for a particular point A and standard generator point G, there is only one possible scalar a which when "multiplied" with G yields A. So scalars and elliptic curve points are a commitment scheme, with both hiding and binding properties.
Now, as mentioned there is a <+> operation on points that is homomorphic to the + operation on corresponding scalars. For example, suppose there are two scalars a and b. I can compute (a + b) <*> G to generate a particular point. But even if I don't know scalars a and b, but I do know points A = a <*> G and B = b <*> G, then I can use A <+> B to derive (a + b) <*> G (or equivalently, (a <*> G) <+> (b <*> G) == (a + b) <*> G). This makes points a homomorphic commitment scheme on scalars.

Confidential Transactions: A Sketch

This is useful since we can easily use the near-256-bit scalars in SECP256K1 elliptic curves to easily represent values in a monetary system, and hide those values by using a homomorphic commitment scheme. We can use the hiding property to prevent people from learning the values of the money we are sending and receiving.
Now, in a proper cryptocurrency, a normal, non-coinbase transaction does not create or destroy coins: the values of the input coins are equal to the value of the output coins. We can use a homomorphic commitment scheme. Suppose I have a transaction that consumes an input value a and creates two output values b and c. That is, a = b + c, i.e. the sum of all inputs a equals the sum of all outputs b and c. But remember, with a homomorphic commitment scheme like elliptic curve points, there exists a <+> operation on points that is homomorphic to the ordinary school-arithmetic + addition on large numbers. So, confidential transactions can use points a <*> G as input, and points b <*> G and c <*> G as output, and we can easily prove that a <*> G = (b <*> G) <+> (c <*> G) if a = b + c, without revealing a, b, or c to anyone.

Pedersen Commitments

Actually, we cannot just use a <*> G as a commitment scheme in practice. Remember, Bitcoin has a cap on the number of satoshis ever to be created, and it's less than 253 satoshis, which is fairly trivial. I can easily compute all values of a <*> G for all values of a from 0 to 253 and know which a <*> G corresponds to which actual amount a. So in confidential transactions, we cannot naively use a <*> G commitments, we need Pedersen commitments.
If you know what a "salt" is, then Pedersen commitments are fairly obvious. A "salt" is something you add to e.g. a password so that the hash of the password is much harder to attack. Humans are idiots and when asked to generate passwords, will output a password that takes less than 230 possibilities, which is fairly easy to grind. So what you do is that you "salt" a password by prepending a random string to it. You then hash the random string + password, and store the random string --- the salt --- together with the hash in your database. Then when somebody logs in, you take the password, prepend the salt, hash, and check if the hash matches with the in-database hash, and you let them log in. Now, with a hash, even if somebody copies your password database, the can't get the password. They're hashed. But with a salt, even techniques like rainbow tables make a hacker's life even harder. They can't hash a possible password and check every hash in your db for something that matches. Instead, if they get a possible password, they have to prepend each salt, hash, then compare. That greatly increases the computational needs of a hacker, which is why salts are good.
What a Pedersen commitment is, is a point a <*> H, where a is the actual value you commit to, plus <+> another point r <*> G. H here is a second standard generator point, different from G. The r is the salt in the Pedersen commitment. It makes it so that even if you show (a <*> H) <+> (r <*> G) to somebody, they can't grind all possible values of a and try to match it with your point --- they also have to grind r (just as with the password-salt example above). And r is much larger, it can be a true near-256-bit number that is the range of scalars in SECP256K1, whereas a is constrained to "reasonable" numbers of satoshi, which cannot exceed 21 million Bitcoins.
Now, in order to validate a transaction with input a and outputs b and c, you only have to prove a = b + c. Suppose we are hiding those amounts using Pedersen commitments. You have an input of amount a, and you know a and r. The blockchain has an amount (a <*> H) <+> (r <*> G). In order to create the two outputs b and c, you just have to create two new r scalars such that r = r[0] + r[1]. This is trivial, you just select a new random r[0] and then compute r[1] = r - r[0], it's just basic algebra.
Then you create a transaction consuming the input (a <*> H) <+> (r <*> G) and outputs (b <*> H) <+> (r[0] <*> G) and (c <*> H) <+> (r[1] <*> G). You know that a = b + c, and r = r[0] + r[1], while fullnodes around the world, who don't know any of the amounts or scalars involved, can just take the points (a <*> H) <+> (r <*> G) and see if it equals (b <*> H) <+> (r[0] <*> G) <+> (c <*> H) <+> (r[1] <*> G). That is all that fullnodes have to validate, they just need to perform <+> operations on points and comparison on points, and from there they validate transactions, all without knowing the actual values involved.

Computational Binding, Information-Theoretic Hiding

Like all commitments, Pedersen Commitments are binding and hiding.
However, there are really two kinds of commitments:
What does this mean? It's just a measure of how "impossible" binding vs hiding is. Pedersen commitments are computationally binding, meaning that in theory, a user of this commitment with arbitrary time and space and energy can, in theory, replace the amount with something else. However, it is information-theoretic hiding, meaning an attacker with arbitrary time and space and energy cannot figure out exactly what got hidden behind the commitment.
But why?
Now, we have been using a and a <*> G as private keys and public keys in ECDSA and Schnorr. There is an operation <*> on a scalar and a point that generates another point, but we cannot "revrese" this operation. For example, even if I know A, and know that A = a <*> G, but do not know a, I cannot derive a --- there is no operation between A G that lets me know a.
Actually there is: I "just" need to have so much time, space, and energy that I just start counting a from 0 to 2256 and find which a results in A = a <*> G. This is a computational limit: I don't have a spare universe in my back pocket I can use to do all those computations.
Now, replace a with h and A with H. Remember that Pedersen commitments use a "second" standard generator point. The generator points G and H are "not really special" --- they are just random points on the curve that we selected and standardized. There is no operation H G such that I can learn h where H = h <*> G, though if I happen to have a spare universe in my back pocket I can "just" brute force it.
Suppose I do have a spare universe in my back pocket, and learn h = H G such that H = h <*> G. What can I do in Pedersen commitments?
Well, I have an amount a that is committed to by (a <*> H) <+> (r <*> G). But I happen to know h! Suppose I want to double my money a without involving Elon Musk. Then:
That is what we mean by computationally binding: if I can compute h such that H = h <*> G, then I can find another number which opens the same commitment. And of course I'd make sure that number is much larger than what I originally had in that address!
Now, the reason why it is "only" computationally binding is that it is information-theoretically hiding. Suppose somebody knows h, but has no money in the cryptocurrency. All they see are points. They can try to find what the original amounts are, but because any amount can be mapped to "the same" point with knowledge of h (e.g. in the above, a and 2 * a got mapped to the same point by "just" replacing the salt r with r - a * h; this can be done for 3 * a, 4 * a etc.), they cannot learn historical amounts --- the a in historical amounts could be anything.
The drawback, though, is that --- as seen above --- arbitrary inflation is now introduced once somebody knows h. They can multiply their money by any arbitrary factor with knowledge of h.
It is impossible to have both perfect hiding (i.e. historical amounts remain hidden even after a computational break) and perfect binding (i.e. you can't later open the commitment to a different, much larger, amount).
Pedersen commitments just happen to have perfect hiding, but only computationally-infeasible binding. This means they allow hiding historical values, but in case of anything that allows better computational power --- including but not limited to quantum breaks --- they allow arbitrary inflation.

Changing The Tradeoffs with ElGamal Commitments

An ElGamal commitment is just a Pedersen commitment, but with the point r <*> G also stored in a separate section of the transaction.
This commits the r, and fixes it to a specific value. This prevents me from opening my (a <*> H) <+> (r <*> G) as ((2 * a) <*> H) <+> ((r - a * h) <*> G), because the (r - a * h) would not match the r <*> G sitting in a separate section of the transaction. This forces me to be bound to that specific value, and no amount of computation power will let me escape --- it is information-theoretically binding i.e. perfectly binding.
But that is now computationally hiding. An evil surveillor with arbitrary time and space can focus on the r <*> G sitting in a separate section of the transaction, and grind r from 0 to 2256 to determine what r matches that point. Then from there, they can negate r to get (-r) <*> G and add it to the (a <*> H) <+> (r <*> G) to get a <*> H, and then grind that to determine the value a. With massive increases in computational ability --- including but not limited to quantum breaks --- an evil surveillor can see all the historical amounts of confidential transactions.

Conclusion

This is the source of the tradeoff: either you design confidential transactions so in case of a quantum break, historical transactions continue to hide their amounts, but inflation of the money is now unavoidable, OR you make the money supply sacrosanct, but you potentially sacrifice amount hiding in case of some break, including but not limited to quantum breaks.
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